1. IP addresses are NOT logged in this forum so there's no point asking. Members are encouraged to install GOM or HOLA or TUNNELBEAR for an added layer of protection.

    The SEX forum is HERE so please stop asking.

Schools in Iskandar

Discussion in 'A Singaporean's guide to Living In JB' started by wolverine23, May 26, 2013.

  1. freedom

    freedom Alfrescian Old Timer

    Joined:
    Jun 29, 2013
    Messages:
    508
    Likes Received:
    7
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Thanks. Just checked with a school. Student pass is needed then can get guardian pass for a yr, renewable. No need mm2h.
     
  2. freedom

    freedom Alfrescian Old Timer

    Joined:
    Jun 29, 2013
    Messages:
    508
    Likes Received:
    7
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Anyone knows how much is the Sunway College A level fees a year for foreign students?
     
  3. Tekkun

    Tekkun Alfrescian Old Timer

    Joined:
    Jun 1, 2015
    Messages:
    1,878
    Likes Received:
    4
    Trophy Points:
    0
    I just paid RM13750 for each semester of my daughter's Ausmat.

    Cambridge A level has 3 semesters per year and I don't think the fees differ a lot but it is a 2 year programme.
     
  4. freedom

    freedom Alfrescian Old Timer

    Joined:
    Jun 29, 2013
    Messages:
    508
    Likes Received:
    7
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Thanks, could not find the info on their website...
     
  5. Tekkun

    Tekkun Alfrescian Old Timer

    Joined:
    Jun 1, 2015
    Messages:
    1,878
    Likes Received:
    4
    Trophy Points:
    0
    I can ask my daughter to get the brochures.
    PM me if you need.
     
  6. freedom

    freedom Alfrescian Old Timer

    Joined:
    Jun 29, 2013
    Messages:
    508
    Likes Received:
    7
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Sure, thanks..
     
  7. Tekkun

    Tekkun Alfrescian Old Timer

    Joined:
    Jun 1, 2015
    Messages:
    1,878
    Likes Received:
    4
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Couldn't get it attached in PM so here is the fees structure.

    Sunway fees.JPG
     
  8. freedom

    freedom Alfrescian Old Timer

    Joined:
    Jun 29, 2013
    Messages:
    508
    Likes Received:
    7
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Thanks for the info...
     
  9. Frodo

    Frodo Alfrescian Old Timer

    Joined:
    Jul 29, 2013
    Messages:
    3,907
    Likes Received:
    34
    Trophy Points:
    48
  10. sgtsk

    sgtsk Alfrescian Old Timer

    Joined:
    Mar 13, 2012
    Messages:
    768
    Likes Received:
    9
    Trophy Points:
    18
    Got a few friends who forgo normal schooling systems and have been sending their children to good private tuition schools to prepare for Cambridge o and a levels and successfully got into reasonably good unis in US and UK.
     
  11. Frodo

    Frodo Alfrescian Old Timer

    Joined:
    Jul 29, 2013
    Messages:
    3,907
    Likes Received:
    34
    Trophy Points:
    48
    That's what I want to do for my eldest girl too. Prep her for a year or two in a private tuition school to spot A level questions. And no need to take the wayang Singapore-Cambridge A level, just the international one can liao.
     
  12. freedom

    freedom Alfrescian Old Timer

    Joined:
    Jun 29, 2013
    Messages:
    508
    Likes Received:
    7
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Where r the good private tuition schools? In Sg or JB? What r their charges like?
     
  13. sgtsk

    sgtsk Alfrescian Old Timer

    Joined:
    Mar 13, 2012
    Messages:
    768
    Likes Received:
    9
    Trophy Points:
    18
    My friends live in klang valley area, mostly near subang jaya. If I remembered correctly, around 1 k MR per mth. I just to highlight this as another path for children's education in Malaysia, some called it home schooling. If I could find out, I would post here.

    Update
    got some infor now:
    I level: 1 to 2 K mr;
    A level: 50K mr for 18 mths
     
    Last edited: Apr 3, 2016
  14. sgtsk

    sgtsk Alfrescian Old Timer

    Joined:
    Mar 13, 2012
    Messages:
    768
    Likes Received:
    9
    Trophy Points:
    18
    Definitely a way worth considering. Many young Malaysians have been doing
    matriculation or pre university in some institutes such as Taylor college, INTI,...

    Anyone interested could just search using Google for malaysian pre university programmes

    Here is a link I found

    http://www.malaysia-students.com/2007/12/popular-pre-university-programmes-in.html?m=1


    Another link here
    http://www.malaysia-education.com/pre-university.html
     
    Last edited: Apr 3, 2016
  15. Tekkun

    Tekkun Alfrescian Old Timer

    Joined:
    Jun 1, 2015
    Messages:
    1,878
    Likes Received:
    4
    Trophy Points:
    0
    You don't really need to do A levels only. It is not the only choice.
    You can do IB Diploma, Ausmat, American Transfer Degree, Foundation in Arts or Science, etc. And all these are recognised by unversities. What is important is to know what university or country you are targetting.

    A level is study throughout and exam end of the year style. Others is a 50% assignment / 50% exam marking system Ausmat (Australian Matriculation). Others offer foundation tied to the university and it is automatic entry to that university. Eg. MUFY (Monash)
    Even Heriot Watt offer foundation too.

    Private tuition, check this out as well: https://aceedventure.com/
     
  16. Woon12

    Woon12 New Member

    Joined:
    Mar 27, 2017
    Messages:
    2
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Hi, is there have any more information about the sunway international school and fairview? Because i am consider these two international school.
     
  17. Woon12

    Woon12 New Member

    Joined:
    Mar 27, 2017
    Messages:
    2
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Have any more information about sunway and fairview? Because i am consider these two international school.
     
  18. FHBH12

    FHBH12 Alfrescian Old Timer

    Joined:
    Jul 4, 2012
    Messages:
    4,517
    Likes Received:
    37
    Trophy Points:
    48
    International schools in Singapore still growing

    Tuesday, Mar 28, 2017

    Expatriate growth in Singapore may have tapered off due to tighter control of the inflow of foreign labour, but demand at international schools here continues to climb, going by a study by International School Consultancy (ISC) Research.

    In many other South-east Asian countries, demand is even stronger, driven by the local population, said Sami Yosef, head of South East Asia Research at ISC Research.

    In Singapore, international school enrolment jumped 12 per cent from 47,000 in 2012 to 2013, but the increase has eased off thereafter.

    The official number as of May 2016 stands at 59,900 students, up 27 per cent over the entire period.

    Across South-east Asia in general, about 94,000 more students were enrolled in international schools in 2016 compared to 2012, a 34 per cent increase.

    The research consultancy released the data in a report on March 9, ahead of the International Private Schools Education Forum conference in Kuala Lumpur on March 22 to 24.

    As of the first quarter of 2017, Singapore ranks third in South-east Asia for the number of students enrolled in international schools, with 63,789 students.

    Malaysia and Thailand top the table with 71,589 and 65,928 pupils enrolled, respectively.

    The data also showed that the number of international schools in Singapore increased by about 32 per cent from 65 in 2012 to 86 in 2016.

    The Business Times reported earlier this month that at least five international schools have added to their capacity by expanding their current campuses or moving to new locations between 2015 and 2020.

    ISC Research recorded a 39 per cent growth in the number of international schools in South-east Asia from 725 to 1008 over the same period.

    The consultancy defines international schools as those delivering a curriculum wholly or partly in English outside an English-speaking country.

    In countries like Singapore, where English is one of the official languages, an international school is one that is international in its orientation and offers an English-medium curriculum other than the country's national curriculum.

    Mr Yosef said that the international school market in South-east Asia has continued to grow despite cutbacks in expatriate workforces after the oil and gas market slump in late 2014.

    In many South-east Asian countries, the demand for international education appears to stem from the local populations, he added.

    The slower growth among international schools in Singapore may be attributed to the Ministry of Education (MOE)'s policy of not allowing Singaporean students to enrol at international schools here, except when approved under special circumstances.

    "In Thailand's premium international schools (the leading international schools, typically with the highest school fees), the number of Thai students is growing at a faster rate than that of expatriate students," said Mr Yosef.

    ISC Research sampled 306 international schools throughout South-east Asia and found Thai and Malaysian to be the most prevalent nationalities in current enrolments, each making up 12 per cent.

    Students of American and South Korean heritage each make up 6 per cent of students at international schools in the region, with British students coming in at 5 per cent.

    International schools in Malaysia that BT spoke with said that local student enrolment has increased slowly, but is now a significant part of the school populations.

    At the Marlborough College in Iskandar, school fees are comparable to those at international schools in Singapore, ranging from RM77,000 (S$24,000) to RM177,500 annually.

    Despite the hefty price tag, about a quarter of the student population consists of local students, said master of Marlborough College Robert Pick.

    The numbers are even higher at Excelsior International School, also in Iskandar, with 60 to 70 per cent of the students holding Malaysian passports.

    Lai E-Lan, senior vice-president of strategic planning and administration at Excelsior, said: "Many parents recognise that children need to be global citizens and have the life skills that enable them to do so in the future - international schools provide the environment, platform, resources and support in this area."

    Melaka International School (MIS), has also seen a significant shift in the pattern of parents opting to send their children to international instead of national schools, with a student population that is 71 per cent Malaysian.

    MIS vice-principal Anu Thiruselvam said parents are drawn to aspects such as the English-medium education and UK curriculum, as well as their focus on each child's learning ability and a low student-teacher ratio to help students perform better academically.

    However, while enrolling local students is not an option for international schools here, they can be rest assured that mainstream schools have not been eating into their share of the education market.

    International students make up only about 5 per cent of the student population in Singapore's mainstream schools, a number which MOE says has remained fairly constant over the past years.

    Students seeking admission to mainstream schools at the Primary 2 to 5 or Secondary 1 to 3 levels are required to take a test on English and mathematics in the Admissions Exercise for International Students (AEIS).

    The number of applications for the AEIS ranges from 3,000 to 3,500 yearly, with passing rates varying from year to year.

    For successful applicants, subsequent placements depend on available vacancies and the applicants' declared residential area in Singapore.

    "(The AEIS test) helps to ensure that international students admitted to our mainstream schools are able to cope with the requirements of the Singapore curriculum," said MOE.

    [email protected]

    - See more at: http://news.asiaone.com/news/singap...-singapore-still-growing#sthash.V6c7yott.dpuf
     
  19. Duckson

    Duckson New Member

    Joined:
    Apr 28, 2017
    Messages:
    2
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    I just went to Sunway's open day last week.Facilities are new and they have a swimming pool albeit smaller in size.Other standard facilities included multi purpose hall,computer lab,visual arts and music rooms etc.

    The school provides ontario curriculum till grade 10 and for grade 11 & 12, the IB diploma programme. No other choice which i'm fine since i view the IB as more holistic.Class size for grade 7-10 is about 10 students per grade. There are two canteens serving the primary and secondary students respectively.

    During the visit, i managed to speak to the principal, teachers and students. I am comfortable with the conversation with principal and teachers as they are not pushy in getting my signature on the payment slip. They were in fact very professional and focused on sharing with me and wife about how lessons are conducted on a daily basis. They didnt even compare themselves with other education systems. In the business model, they probably have to do this but i find them really impressive. Most teachers are also from Canada with a handful of locals.

    The grade 9 student ambassador facilitating my tour is from Japan.From what i observed, the school has a good mix of students of different nationalities.But i may be wrong as the school did not reveal the demographics.Nontheless, the students' command of english was pretty impressive.I did not converse with them in mandarin though.

    For the IB programme, perhaps the school is still new, the subjects offered are still limited to the standard readings although the IB coordinator mentions about expanding the range of offering when the school increase in student enrolments and interests. As of now, none of the students are taking any science or math pathway.

    Overall, i am very comfortable with sunway's running and conduct of its curriculum. Its possible international mix of students does encourage the outlook of this school in my potential list. Will be visiting fairview in the coming weeks.
     
  20. Duckson

    Duckson New Member

    Joined:
    Apr 28, 2017
    Messages:
    2
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Went to Fairview JB campus last week.The school shifted to its existing building about 1.5 years ago & has about 400 students from pre-school grade 11.
    The school is currently offering IB PY & MY programmes and uses Cambridge syllabus.Class size per grade is about 25 and 2 teachers are assigned to each class. Teachers tenure is about 2 years although some teachers have been with the school for more than 5 years.Teachers are mainly locals.
    The student are 60% locals, 40% foreigners although I feel that the latter's population may be smaller.
    Facilities are pretty standard; classrooms, subject rooms, Halls, game courts.It does lack a swimming pool and students will use the pool in the former building during swimming classes.
    As I visited the school after school hours, I didnt manage to speak to any teachers or students.I did see remdial classes going on and a few students at the library doing some studies.In terms of management, the school gave an assuring feeling with their operations.There was only one issue-the school didnt offer IGCSE or IBDP option at grade 12 in this campus.Although I was told by the administrator that the campus was preparing to offer the IBDP in a couple of years,I wasnt quite convinced as the rest of Fairview campuses,apart from KL, werent going for the certification.This would mean changing schools at the end of grade 11 for pre-uni qualifications.
    In the absence of interaction with students and teachers and with the llittle printed information given by the school,I had the feeling the standard of Mandarin would be better than English but I might be wrong.
    The fee is one of the more affordable ones but that also mean everything is kept to needs like basic library, facilities etc.Teachers are locals with a few foreign teachers but thats probably to meet the local needs.Overall, the school is a no frill one and worth considering.However, the lack of pre-university education does make the consideration a little more difficult.
     

Share This Page