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New developments to share

Discussion in 'A Singaporean's guide to Living In JB' started by wuqi256, Jan 3, 2012.

  1. Valdez

    Valdez Alfrescian Old Timer

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    Defining moment for Iskandar Malaysia


    Your window to Malaysia
    Saturday, 23 March 2013
    Font-size: A | A | A
    by Leu Siew Ying of The Edge Singapore on Thursday, 21 March 2013 08:00

    The fortunes of southern Johor have ebbed and flowed with the shifting economic relationship between Singapore and Malaysia. Now, amid grand initiatives that are drawing the two countries closer together, the southern tip of Peninsular Malaysia is experiencing an investment boom.

    Choo Yeow Ming, a lawyer-turned-businessman, fondly remembers growing up in Johor Baru during the 1960s. He frequently followed his parents for late-night suppers at hawker stalls in the town. And, they would often take him to the Cathay cinema, a stone's throw from the Causeway. "My mother loved Cantonese opera," he says. "The shows finished at about 11pm, and we'd walk home. It was a good 20 minutes."

    Things began to change quickly in the 1970s, though. Singapore turned itself into an attractive destination for foreign investment and quickly developed its manufacturing, transportation and financial services sectors. The Singapore dollar, which traded at a par with the Malaysian ringgit until 1973, began to appreciate steadily. Wages in Singapore, which were always a little higher than in JB, began rising faster too.

    The cheaper cost of living in JB made the town a natural place for Malaysians working in Singapore to live. In fact, by the 1980s, JB had morphed into a dormitory town of sorts, housing workers from all over Malaysia who commuted daily to Singapore's factories, shops and hotels on buses and motorcycles. Meanwhile, many Singaporeans began travelling to JB on weekends for cheap shopping, restaurant meals and nightclub entertainment.

    However, that created an insalubrious environment and drove up the crime rate. "It became a sleazy town. The boom in karaoke bars brought undesirable elements," Choo says. "The crime rate was so high that Singaporeans dared not go there."

    Choo knew well what Singaporeans thought of JB because he had gone to study in a Singapore school in 1971 on a scholarship. He later attended university in the US, and worked there as a lawyer for several years. He then moved to Hong Kong, initially to expand the law practice with which he was associated, but later got into a range of businesses himself.

    By 2004, he was hankering for a slower pace of life and decided to move closer to home. But instead of returning to JB, he relocated to Singapore, where he now lives in a Good Class Bungalow in an exclusive neighbourhood. Among Choo's current business interests is a controlling stake in Singapore Exchange-listed Asia-Pacific Strategic Investments, a provider of bereavement services that is now in the process of restructuring itself into a power generation company.

    Since moving to Singapore, Choo has watched with amazement the changes taking place in his hometown across the Causeway. "For some time now, I can see that JB has transformed," he says. Six years ago, the Iskandar Malaysia development region was launched, with the aim of unlocking the economic potential of southern Johor, by leveraging its abundant supply of land, relatively inexpensive labour and proximity to Singapore.

    Already, a number of universities have opened in Iskandar Malaysia, and a top-notch British school is attracting the children of well-heeled parents in Singapore. Theme parks and a discounted brands outlet have opened. Hospitals have sprung up and residential properties are selling like hot cakes. This year, movie production facilities affiliated to the UK's Pinewood Studios are scheduled to open. A new immigration checkpoint is also scheduled to open at Puteri Harbour in the next few months to service water taxis plying the Johor Straits.

    Meanwhile, an oil-and-gas hub is taking shape with Malaysia's Petroliam Nasional investing RM60 billion ($24 billion) in a refinery and petrochemical complex; and Bursa Malaysia-listed Dialog group, Royal Vopak of the Netherlands and the Johor state government building a RM5 billion deepwater oil terminal.

    Last week, the Iskandar Malaysia initiative got a significant boost with the launch of two "wellness" projects by Malaysia's Prime Minister Najib Razak and Singapore's Prime Minister Lee Hsien Loong. The projects, with a combined value of RM5.2 billion, are jointly owned by Temasek Holdings and Khazanah Nasional, through Pulau Indah Ventures, a vehicle in which they have equal stakes.

    The "wellness" projects, which are essentially property developments that incorporate spas, a corporate training facility and retail outlets, came about following a deal in which Malaysia exchanged its railway land in Singapore for development land in Marina South and the Ophir-Rochor area. As part of that land swap, the two governments also undertook to cooperate in the development of Iskandar Malaysia.

    Other projects that were announced during the meeting between the two prime ministers included plans for a high-speed rail link between Singapore and Kuala Lumpur; a feasibility study into a third road link between the two countries; a new ferry service that will run between Iskandar Malaysia's Puteri Harbour and Singapore; and a $3.2 billion property development project in Danga Bay led by CapitaLand, Temasek Holdings and Iskandar Waterfront.

    Now, JB is emerging as more than just a dormitory town to support Singapore's booming industries. Instead, together with the whole Iskandar Malaysia region, it could become more closely integrated with Singapore's economy and provide an alternative lifestyle for residents of space-constrained Singapore. In the process, property prices in Iskandar Malaysia, which have already soared, could continue climbing higher.

    Choo likens the relationship between Iskandar Malaysia and Singapore to that between Shenzhen and Hong Kong. "Shenzhen was a fishing village. It also had a high crime rate because of all the factors I mentioned," Choo says. "Now, it is a well-run city and one of the most expensive in China in terms of property prices. Once wealth comes in, people start to protect the environment and things improve. It is now easier to find jobs, so there is less crime."

    If the same thing happens in Iskandar Malaysia, it could become a more acceptable place for residents of Singapore to live, Choo continues. In fact, his niece and her husband, who both work in Singapore, have chosen to live across the Causeway and commute every day. "I have no reason to go and live there," says Choo, 59, alluding to the wealth he has already accumulated. "My niece and her husband are young. If they were to buy something here, they would be incurring debt instead of happily raising kids."

    Is Iskandar Malaysia resetting the symbiotic relationship between southern Johor and Singapore? What new synergies can JB and Singapore unlock from their close proximity? Have property prices in Iskandar Malaysia run up too much? What is the risk of the whole Iskandar Malaysia initiative losing momentum?


    Stretching from the eastern to the western coast of the southern tip of Peninsular Malaysia and as far north as the town of Kulai, Iskandar Malaysia spans some 2,200 sq km, or about three times the size of Singapore. To date, the federal government has spent more than RM7.3 billion to build infrastructure in Iskandar Malaysia, including highways and utilities. And, committed investment in the region as at end-2012 stood at RM106.3 billion, more than the target of RM100 billion that the Malaysian government had set.

    Ismail Ibrahim, CEO of Iskandar Regional Development Authority (IRDA), a statutory body set up to organise and promote the growth of Iskandar Malaysia, says part of the reason for the strong investment figures is the boom in property development, which was actually not a sector that was being promoted. Of the total investment funds attracted, the manufacturing sector accounted for some 29%, while the property sector followed closely behind, accounting for 25.6%. The utilities sector was in a distant third place, accounting for 6%.

    Has there been overinvestment in property in Iskandar Malaysia? Ismail points out that the raw investment figures don't accurately reflect the future economic activity or population growth that is likely to take place in the area. While manufacturing projects tend to be capital-intensive, service industries usually don't require much upfront investment. Yet, it is service-oriented businesses that tend to have a greater multiplier effect on the domestic economy.

    In education, for instance, Iskandar Malaysia has attracted 12 institutions, which include those that are public-, private-, foreign- and local-owned. Some of the education facilities that have opened are Marlborough College's first international branch, University of Newcastle's medical faculty and University of Southampton's engineering faculty. More than 100 children are crossing the Second Link every day to go to school in Marlborough College, which is a switch from the legions of Malaysian students who have traditionally crossed the Causeway to their schools in Singapore.

    "We anticipate that by 2015, the student population in Iskandar Malaysia will grow to 80,000," says Ismail. Some of these students, it is envisaged, will form part of the pool of talent required to support the services sector in Iskandar Malaysia. These would include people with the technical skills as well as creative talent to support Pinewood Iskandar Malaysia Studios.


    Lim Boon Ping, who grew up in Ulu Tiram, a town located 18km to the northeast of JB, and now runs his family's real-estate business, Tiram Realty, says the growth in the number of people coming to Iskandar Malaysia for business is adding to the services boom. "Previously, people were not keen to invest in hotels. Now, I have many clients who want to build hotels," he notes. Moreover, MNCs operating out of the greater Kuala Lumpur area now want to set up a base in Iskandar Malaysia, he adds.

    Lim of Tiram Realty says property prices in Iskandar Malaysia have certainly risen sharply. Yet, he believes the elevated prices are sustainable because the profile of the buyers has changed. While a 1,000 sq ft property priced at RM1,000 psf is equivalent to 27 years of an average Malaysian salary, it is only 10 years of an average Singaporean salary. Moreover, the buyers who are getting into the market now are quite prepared to hold the properties for the long term, he claims. "Now, it's a much healthier market. It's more solid. People are buying for investment purposes. In the past, they bought to flip."

    Lim also points out that top-end residential property prices in Iskandar Malaysia are still well below those of similar developments in Kuala Lumpur. So far, the most expensive development in Iskandar Malaysia is a condominium project called Lido Boulevard, which is expected to be priced at about $1,000 psf. By comparison, Pavilion Private Residences, one of Kuala Lumpur's latest upmarket condo development, is selling at RM2,000 psf. Lim isn't betting that prices in Iskandar Malaysia will exceed prices in Kuala Lumpur anytime soon, though, because it doesn't yet have the population to support it. Instead, he sees prices in Iskandar Malaysia hovering at a 30% to 40% discount to prices in KL.

    So, who are the buyers from Singapore supporting the property market in southern Johor? Are they really prepared to hold their investments for the long term?

    Changing investor profile

    Michelle Laight, who is from the Philippines, and her British husband Tom, decided to move to Johor two years ago, after more than 20 years in Singapore. The reason was simply that they had grown weary of the overcrowdedness of Singapore and longed for more space. "In the 1990s, there were not as many buildings in Singapore," says Michelle. "Now, you open your eyes and it is stressful — all these highrises."

    As it happened, the move opened the door to opportunities the Laights hadn't expected. The couple, who are in their 60s and 70s, bought a house in an area known as Plentong, just outside Johor Baru. They commute daily to Orchard Road, where they still run their human resources company.

    Last year, the cheap rents on commercial property in Johor prompted the Laights to open a restaurant called Uncle Tom's Tavern near their new home. The new business has since stabilised and has added a rewarding new dimension to their lives. Now, the Laights leave home for Singapore at 8.30am, and head back to Plentong by 3.30pm. That enables them to reach their restaurant in time for the dinner crowd.

    Life in Plentong hasn't been entirely pleasant, though. Since moving there, they have been the victims of a burglary and suffered a nasty road accident. But neither of them regrets the decision to move to Johor. "Here, there is fresh air. You can smell the grass when you wake up," says Michelle. The pace of life is slower and they have found it easier to make friends. "In Singapore, you can't just sit and talk. I always have my pen and paper and calculator. It's always about money," says Michelle.

    Eric Wong, a semi-retired Singaporean, decided to take the plunge with a property in Iskandar Malaysia because it didn't cost much money. He bought a double-storey, semi-detached house in Bukit Indah as an investment for RM928,000 after learning about it from a brochure dropped in his letter box. "As soon as I saw it, I was interested," says Wong. "I went to S P Setia's sales office in VivoCity and immediately booked a unit. It's a fully gated community, so I think it's safe there."

    Wong isn't renting out the house, though. Instead, he goes to his house in Bukit Indah in the morning after dropping his wife off at work and returns at mid-day to pick her up for lunch. According to him, he spends his mornings at the house, trading stocks and watering his lawn. He has spent only one night there since he bought the house three years ago. "I bought the place for future use. If I don't want it, I can sell it," he says.

    Isn't it expensive to maintain a home that you don't actually use all the time? "Property tax is only RM55 a month, quit rent is RM10, security and maintenance is RM120, electricity is RM40, water is RM20, telephone is RM22 and Internet is RM50. I pay $140 in total to maintain the house," he says, showing The Edge Singapore his expense bill.

    The way Wong sees it, the cost of the home and the monthly bills are a small price to pay for the enjoyment and future options it gives him. "My place is beautiful. The compound is big. There is nobody to disturb you," he boasts. "What more do you want for $300,000?"

    A New Jersey or Petaling Jaya?

    Where does Iskandar Malaysia go from here? Will it become more closely integrated with Singapore? And, will that keep property prices up? Agatino Rizzo, an assistant professor of urban planning at Qatar University, who led a research project and summer school on the Singapore-Johor Mega City Region from 2009 to 2010 at Universiti Teknologi Malaysia, says Johor is challenged by its lack of an educated and highly skilled workforce. As long as the knowledge gap between Singapore and Johor remains wide, Johor will not strategically benefit from rising costs in Singapore, Rizzo tells The Edge Singapore.

    However, it is proving to be an attractive place for Singapore's working professionals and business people to live. Rizzo says there are already some 30,000 Malaysian workers who commute to work in Singapore every day. "So, I think that, given the cheaper price for high-end properties in Iskandar, if the Tuas Link will continue to provide efficient and rapid custom clearance, more and more Malaysian workers (professionals, educated and skilled labour) will choose to live in Iskandar," he says.

    For Singaporeans to relocate to Iskandar Malaysia en masse, however, more conditions need to be met. Among other things, there would have to be lots of good English-curriculum schools as well as affordable facilities for leisure activities such as golf and sailing. It would also be imperative that there is a fast and reliable means of commuting to and from Singapore.

    Is Iskandar Malaysia to Singapore what Shenzhen is to Hong Kong? Could it one day be to Singapore what New Jersey and Connecticut are to Manhattan? Or, closer to home, could it be to Singapore what Petaling Jaya is to Kuala Lumpur?

    The obvious difference is that Malaysia and Singapore are separate countries. "Thus [the] Singapore-JB case is much more complex than [the] others, because besides financial and infrastructure challenges, we have more important political differences that are tied to history, post-colonial heritage and nation-building," says Rizzo.
    Yet, there are examples of conurbations that transcend national borders. Denmark's capital city of Copenhagen is linked by a bridge to the Swedish city of Malmo, much as Singapore is linked to JB by the Causeway. Like Singapore and Malaysia, which were under British colonial rule, Denmark and Sweden, during the Middle Ages, were a single country, notes Rizzo. Copenhagen was the key centre of the empire at the time, while Singapore was a key centre of the Straits Settlements during the colonial era, he adds.

    "However, [Copenhagen and Malmo] are contained within the European Union supranational organisation that is a much politically stronger union than Asean is. This united political platform [of the EU] provides for a common transport policy and sharing of benefits," Rizzo says.

    The big question now is whether warming relations between Malaysia and Singapore forge closer cooperation and a stronger shared interest in Iskandar Malaysia. And, even if that happens, it remains to be seen how quickly that translates into an influx of business and people into the area.

    Choo figures that the strong investor interest in his hometown is creating an exciting opportunity for property developers. And, he might get into the game himself. "I'm thinking of developing offices and link shophouses there," he says. But he's less certain if he would be prepared to invest in properties for yield and capital appreciation at this point. "Property prices are not cheap," he says. "Investment is not a good idea because there is too much supply."

    For many Singaporeans, however, the steep discount in property prices across the Causeway versus the local market is too good an opportunity to pass up.

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    Last edited: Mar 23, 2013
  2. Valdez

    Valdez Alfrescian Old Timer

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    Woh! 200,000 Singaporeans living in Johore now.

    Carnival-like launches a hit

    Posted on March 22, 2013 - Featured, Property News.

    Story and photos by ZAZALI MUSA
    [email protected]


    Modern feel: The living room at the show unit of D’Summit Residences @ Johor Baru in Taman Kempas Utama.

    PROPERTY launches in Iskandar Malaysia are becoming more carnival-like nowadays as competition in the property market in South Johor picks up.

    Many developers pick Saturdays and Sundays to launch their new projects or new phases as it can attract a big crowd.

    Apart from offering discounts for early birds, some developers also throw in free gifts such as air-conditioned units or even kitchen cabinets.

    Guests are often treated to free food and beverages while children who come along with their parents will be entertained with fun-filled activities such as magic shows and colouring contests.

    “Weekend is the best time for property launches as many of the potential buyers will usually be free,” IOI Properties Bhd senior general manager Simon Heng told MetroBiz.

    He said normally, Malaysian and Singaporean property buyers bring along their family members, relatives or friends for their house-hunting trips.

    Heng said this is good because those who tag along might also consider purchasing properties.

    He said many Singaporean buyers looking for private residential properties in Johor Baru normally came over on Saturdays or Sundays and therefore, it makes sense to conduct new launches on the weekends.

    Heng said this at the opening of the developer’s RM3mil sales gallery, IOI Galleria, on Jalan Kempas Lama, Johor Baru, by the company’s executive chairman Tan Sri Lee Shin Cheng.


    Choices aplenty: Visitors looking the model of Taman Kempas Utama development at IOI Galleria.

    Also present at the event were executive director Lee Yeow Seng, acting general manager Lou Fu Leong and marketing and sales department (property division) senior manager Kelvin Tang.

    In conjunction with the opening of the sales gallery, the company also launched the first tower block of D’Summit Residences @ Johor Baru in Taman Kempas Utama.

    The 35-storey block consists of 850 units of one, two and three-bedroom units with a built-up area of 572 sq ft, 764 sq ft and 904 sq ft, respectively, priced between RM350,000 and RM800,000 each.

    Altogether, the development will consist of six blocks with 3,150 condominium units with a gross development value of RM240mil.

    “D’Summit is the largest ever multi-storey residential towers in the Kempas-Tebrau growth corridor and we are banking on its strategic location to attract buyers,” he said.

    Heng added that Kempas had been designated as an integrated public transportation hub for Iskandar, making the units a good buy for investors.

    He said that with the Rapid Transit System to link Johor Baru and Singapore already in the pipeline, it would attract Malaysians working in the republic as well as Singaporeans looking to buy residential properties in Iskandar.

    Heng said the company was upbeat on the property outlook in Iskandar as it had helped to push the demand for properties in South Johor in the past six to seven years.

    “As Iskandar is developing and progressing, it will continue to attract domestic and foreign investors. Therefore, demand for properties will also pick up,” he said.

    Meanwhile, Lou said Singapore’s latest measures in January to cool the property market in the republic would benefit developers in South Johor.

    He said average Singaporeans and Singapore permanent residents (PRs) were finding it “almost impossible” to own private residential properties in the republic after the measures had been implemented.

    Lou said Johor Baru was the next best location for them.

    Unofficial statistics showed that there are about 200,000 Singaporeans living in Johor Baru and they commute daily between Johor Baru and the republic to work.

    Marketing and sales department (property division) senior manager Kelvin Tang said demand for high-rise residential properties in Iskandar was rising.

    “The last four to five years have seen many new high-rise residential property projects launched in Iskandar and many developers are cashing in on the trend,” he said.

    Tang said buyers in South Johor were now attracted to high-rise living in apartments or condominiums mainly due to the easy access to a host of amenities and facilities.

    The amenities include a swimming pool, gymnasium, nursery, multi-purpose hall, children’s playground, laundrette and food and beverage outlets.

    “Another strong selling point is the gated and guarded concept as residents know that they will have a peace of mind,” he said.

    Tang said like in the Klang Valley and Penang, many of the high-rise condominium projects in South Johor are also offering the concept of resort living.

    He said while nothing much could be done to the structure or the floor area of high-rise condominium towers, developers were now focused on landscaping and related elements.

    “You will see tropical gardens, Zen concept or even Balinese water features at new condominium projects,” said Tang.

    He said with the hike in land prices in Iskandar, more developers in South Johor were now embarking on high-rise residential projects to fully utilise land space.

    IOI Properties would be launching its new high-rise residential project D’Prominenz, which consists of 2,000 condominium units on a 4.04ha site in Plentong, Johor Baru, in June.

    For details on Kempas Utama, call 07-558 2233, email [email protected] or visit www.ioijohor.com
     
  3. FHBH12

    FHBH12 Alfrescian Old Timer

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    Cant be so many...probably around 100,000 is more realistic.
     
  4. gooddebt

    gooddebt Alfrescian Old Timer

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    Any supporting evidence of your 100k ?
     
  5. FHBH12

    FHBH12 Alfrescian Old Timer

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    Gut feel. Assuming 30k+ houses are owned by Singaporeans, then x3 (number of members per household), voila you get 100k! :D Since it is quoted here, then someone can use my figure as another "unofficial" statistics :p
     
  6. aliensmotor

    aliensmotor Alfrescian Old Timer

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    Park at mcD opposite of aeon
     
  7. Valdez

    Valdez Alfrescian Old Timer

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    Singaporeans keep complaining about FTs taking away jobs. Very soon with decline of singapore economy (1 -3% growth) we will soon have to take up jobs in iskandar. Then the johoreans will kpkb about Singaporeans taking away their jobs. It's karma!

    Job opportunities at Iskandar Malaysia: It's the next big place to work! - Career Guide | myStarjob.com

    Saturday March 23, 2013
    Job opportunities at Iskandar Malaysia: It's the next big place to work!

    It is estimated that 390,000 new jobs have been created in the Manufacturing and Service sectors alone from 2007 to 2012. The good news? More jobs will come for career seekers!
    With an expected increase in job opportunities and a rising new economy, Iskandar is the place to be for people to launch a successful career. Let’s take a look at what awaits you here.

    Launched in November 2006, Iskandar Malaysia is set to become the country’s most developed region in the south where living, entertainment, environment and business converge within a bustling and vibrant metropolis. The first of its kind, the Government has allocated RM7.3bil for its development to transform this region into a world-class state.

    Its strategic location – which is easily accessible by leading Asian cities – has attracted an influx of both foreign and domestic investments and high-level corporate investors who seek to benefit from Iskandar’s many advantages and high-growth potential. With a size of 2,217 sq km (approximately three times the size of Singapore), Iskandar is envisioned to be a strong and sustainable metropolis of international standing by 2025.

    Since its inception, Iskandar has recorded a total cumulative committed investment of RM106.31bil in various sectors with 41% being realised as of December 2012.

    What does this mean to career seekers? Plenty of opportunities! With its expected rising new economy, it is no wonder that Iskandar is the country’s next big place to work. The Iskandar Regional Development Authority (Irda) – the Federal statutory body responsible for realising the vision and objectives of Iskandar – is set to make Iskandar relevant and unique, especially to draw talents both local and foreign to this region.

    Currently, with its growth of investment, the region has generated an increase in economic activities and correspondingly, higher demand for employees. In fact, it is estimated that 390,000 new jobs have been created in the manufacturing and service sectors alone from 2007 to 2012. The good news? Many more jobs will be made available for career seekers!

    WHY YOU SHOULD CONSIDER ISKANDAR AS A FUTURE EMPLOYMENT HOT SPOT

    • Low inflation rate (less than 3.5%) and unemployment rate of 3%-4%.

    • High-income jobs available in an affordable living environment.

    • State-of-the-art telecommunications with efficient and transparent public institutional framework with better connectivity and mobility initiatives being put into place as the region continues to grow.

    • Dynamic knowledge-based existing clusters for information technology, biotechnology, tourism, education and healthcare, Islamic finance, manufacturing, and electrical and electronic industries.

    • Excellent international tourist destinations and sports facilities, including shopping and healthcare.

    • Ample amount of land spaces for future housing or recreational institution developments.

    • Well thought-out framework, where developments are built for you and your family in mind.

    • Affordable quality housing, excellent education and healthcare infrastructure within safe, liveable communities.

    • 15% tax rate scheme for knowledge workers.

    • Close proximity with various other global hubs.

    • Smart City and Green Agenda initiatives for better quality and standard of living.

    • Crime prevention efforts to ensure a safe living environment for all.

    Job opportunities at Iskandar Malaysia: It's the next big place to work! - Career Guide | myStarjob.com

    Saturday March 23, 2013
    Job opportunities at Iskandar Malaysia: It's the next big place to work!

    It is estimated that 390,000 new jobs have been created in the Manufacturing and Service sectors alone from 2007 to 2012. The good news? More jobs will come for career seekers!
    With an expected increase in job opportunities and a rising new economy, Iskandar is the place to be for people to launch a successful career. Let’s take a look at what awaits you here.

    Launched in November 2006, Iskandar Malaysia is set to become the country’s most developed region in the south where living, entertainment, environment and business converge within a bustling and vibrant metropolis. The first of its kind, the Government has allocated RM7.3bil for its development to transform this region into a world-class state.

    Its strategic location – which is easily accessible by leading Asian cities – has attracted an influx of both foreign and domestic investments and high-level corporate investors who seek to benefit from Iskandar’s many advantages and high-growth potential. With a size of 2,217 sq km (approximately three times the size of Singapore), Iskandar is envisioned to be a strong and sustainable metropolis of international standing by 2025.

    Since its inception, Iskandar has recorded a total cumulative committed investment of RM106.31bil in various sectors with 41% being realised as of December 2012.

    What does this mean to career seekers? Plenty of opportunities! With its expected rising new economy, it is no wonder that Iskandar is the country’s next big place to work. The Iskandar Regional Development Authority (Irda) – the Federal statutory body responsible for realising the vision and objectives of Iskandar – is set to make Iskandar relevant and unique, especially to draw talents both local and foreign to this region.

    Currently, with its growth of investment, the region has generated an increase in economic activities and correspondingly, higher demand for employees. In fact, it is estimated that 390,000 new jobs have been created in the manufacturing and service sectors alone from 2007 to 2012. The good news? Many more jobs will be made available for career seekers!


    WHY YOU SHOULD CONSIDER ISKANDAR AS A FUTURE EMPLOYMENT HOT SPOT

    • Low inflation rate (less than 3.5%) and unemployment rate of 3%-4%.

    • High-income jobs available in an affordable living environment.

    • State-of-the-art telecommunications with efficient and transparent public institutional framework with better connectivity and mobility initiatives being put into place as the region continues to grow.

    • Dynamic knowledge-based existing clusters for information technology, biotechnology, tourism, education and healthcare, Islamic finance, manufacturing, and electrical and electronic industries.

    • Excellent international tourist destinations and sports facilities, including shopping and healthcare.

    • Ample amount of land spaces for future housing or recreational institution developments.

    • Well thought-out framework, where developments are built for you and your family in mind.

    • Affordable quality housing, excellent education and healthcare infrastructure within safe, liveable communities.

    • 15% tax rate scheme for knowledge workers.

    • Close proximity with various other global hubs.

    • Smart City and Green Agenda initiatives for better quality and standard of living.

    • Crime prevention efforts to ensure a safe living environment for all.


    *Source: WWW.ISKANDARMALAYSIA.COM

    THE JOB OPPORTUNITIES THAT AWAIT YOU IN ISKANDAR

    Since its inception in 2006, 554,769 jobs have been created in Iskandar Malaysia. Out of that, less than 40% has been filled. Here’s a quick look on what awaits career seekers in specific sectors.

    FOOD AND AGRO PROCESSING

    Percentage from total jobs created: 10.4%

    Example of existing employers in Iskandar: Kulim (M) Bhd, KFC Holdings (M) Bhd

    TOURISM

    Percentage from total jobs created: 6.56%

    Example of existing employers in Iskandar: Thistle, Grand Bluewave, KSL Resort

    ICT & CREATIVE

    Percentage from total jobs created: 0.37%

    Example of existing employers in Iskandar: JuniAsia, NTT MSC

    FINANCE

    Percentage from total jobs created: 3.96%

    Example of existing employers in Iskandar: CIMB, Maybank, CSOS

    ELECTRICAL & ELECTRONICS AND PETRO & OLEOCHEMICALS

    Percentage from total jobs created: 47.2%

    Example of existing employers in Iskandar: Celestica, Dyson, Western Digital, Technip, Halliburton

    LOGISTICS

    Percentage from total jobs created: 2.02%

    Example of existing employers in Iskandar: Evergreen Heavy Industrial Corp (M)

    OTHERS

    Percentage from total jobs created: 29.5%

    Example of existing employers in Iskandar: JPO, UEM Land, UDA Land

    MORE TO COME!


    • Petronas Refinery and Petrochemical Integrated Development (Rapid) is set to create 40,000 direct employment and 100,000 indirect employment till 2016.

    • Pinewood Iskandar Malaysia Studios will employ more than 2,000 starting this year.

    • Dato’ Onn Specialist Hospital will hire more than 900 individuals starting 2014.

    • Educity seeks more than 7,000 talents.

    • Frost & Sullivan will employ approximately 800 career seekers till 2018.

    • Other projects are set to operate in Iskandar like MSC Cyberport City, Urban and Resort Welness, Motorsports City, Six Flags Entertainment Corp and many more.
     
  8. shctaw

    shctaw Alfrescian (Inf)

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    One project with 3150 units......

    This will be a project like D"Leedon and Reflection.....when developer cannot clear their unit.

    Price from Rm630 to Rm880 is not cheap.

     
  9. FHBH12

    FHBH12 Alfrescian Old Timer

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    At r rate developers r launching condos at these prices, there will be a bubble by end of e year. The govt shd step in as it will b damaging to both JB and SG shd e bubble pops.
     
  10. Daydreamer

    Daydreamer Alfrescian Old Timer

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    Yes thats one coming very soon. A new cooling measure to burst the bubble. 70% loan margin for foreigner. Stop those speculator.
     
  11. shctaw

    shctaw Alfrescian (Inf)

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    You cannot stop a moving ship; you only end up crashing it.

    Singapore have curb after curb; and property prices keep going up.



     
  12. Daydreamer

    Daydreamer Alfrescian Old Timer

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    Agreed part of it. You can't really compare Malaysia with Singapore. In the end of the day lots of people still value safety more than space.
     
  13. streams

    streams Alfrescian Old Timer

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    true..:/ ... I'm usually worried about large scale condo and how it will affect re-sale value, and what tenants and future buyers it will attract. With the exception of certain overseas locations.. etc superb mature cities in Philippines, BBK where core centre land is usually scarce.

    Iskandar is a long-term bet and best to buy from renowned developers.



     
  14. Steventlk

    Steventlk Alfrescian Old Timer

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    Do note that the developer is banking on its "strategic location"! Never trust the developers, they just build and sell and laugh all the way to the bank.

    We must do our due homework.
    In fact, judging by the mass number of units on offer, this development doesn't sound too gd
     
  15. edwinssm

    edwinssm Alfrescian Old Timer

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    I think I'll wait for prices to calm down before buying my retirement home. The current price surge is really baffling. There are so mannnyyyyyyy condo launches at the moment and I just cannot foresee a huge chunk of Singaporeans moving to Johor enmasse.

    I may be wrong, but I feel that the developers are just trying to capitalise on this wave now and make some big bucks.
     
  16. kopikong99

    kopikong99 Alfrescian Old Timer

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    I leave at 7.15 am and managed to reach Gul Circle in Tuas at 7.50 am this morning. Singapore side counter take own sweet time then traffic stretch long long, if not I can reach office in 20 minutes time.

    Still not many Singaporeans moved and stayed in JB yet mostly PR (Quite a number of my colleagues in this group) travelling out.
     
  17. crystal_tiong

    crystal_tiong Alfrescian Old Timer

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    ya lor , dun know where e 200,000 came from simi unofficial source ....maybe they group PRs as singaporeans ....
     
  18. kopikong99

    kopikong99 Alfrescian Old Timer

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    Group the PR under Singaporeans cos driving Sg cars. Got moustache must be the father right?
     
  19. IskandarRocks

    IskandarRocks Alfrescian Old Timer

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  20. aliensmotor

    aliensmotor Alfrescian Old Timer

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    The price wouldn't came down unless you choose the location far far away
     

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