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Earth-man Ending is Warned by 15000 Scientists signed & issued

Discussion in 'The Courtyard Café' started by nkfnkfnkf, Nov 14, 2017.

  1. nkfnkfnkf

    nkfnkfnkf Alfrescian Old Timer

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    http://www.newsweek.com/how-save-hu...ge-action-vast-human-misery-takes-over-709403


    How to Save Humanity: 15,000 Scientists Urge Action Before 'Vast Human Misery' Takes Over
    By Sydney Pereira On 11/13/17 at 12:25 PM
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    Tech & Science Climate Change Climate Science


    More than 15,000 scientists signed a warning letter to humanity. Its namesake? "A Second Notice." These experts are warning humanity for the second time against catastrophic biodiversity loss and widespread misery for humans, in a cautionary message for humans to make major changes.

    The open letter, signed by 15,364 scientists from 184 countries, was published on Monday in BioScience. The massive group of scientists, led by William J. Ripple of Oregon State University, is pleading for humans to cut greenhouse gas emissions, phase out fossil fuels, reduce deforestation, and reverse the trend of collapsing biodiversity.

    “Soon it will be too late to shift course away from our failing trajectory, and time is running out,” the authors concluded. “We must recognize, in our day-to-day lives and in our governing institutions, that Earth with all its life is our only home.”

    Keep up with this story and more by subscribing now

    [​IMG] An aerial view of a deforested Amazonian jungle is seen close to Maraba, in Brazil's central state of Para in this May 3, 2009 file photo. Reuters

    It is the 25th anniversary since thousands of scientists signed a letter warning humanity back in 1992 in the “World Scientists’ Warning to Humanity.” On Monday, scientists are saying humanity has mostly failed at solving the problems that will be likely to lead to “vast human misery,” according to the first letter.

    Since 1960, freshwater resources and vertebrate species have decreased by around 25 percent. Marine dead zones have skyrocketed by three-quarters. Carbon dioxide emissions have increased by 62 percent since 1960. The human population has increased by 35 percent and livestock by 20 percent.

    “Moreover,” the authors write, “we have unleashed a mass extinction event, the sixth in roughly 540 million years, wherein many current life forms could be annihilated or at least committed to extinction by the end of this century.”

    [​IMG] Binata Pinata stands on top of a rock holding a fish her husband Kaibakia just caught off Bikeman islet, located off South Tarawa in the central Pacific island nation of Kiribati May 25, 2013. With surrounding sea levels rising, Kiribati President Anote Tong has predicted his country will likely become uninhabitable in 30-60 years because of inundation and contamination of its freshwater supplies. Reuters

    The one shining light is the decrease of ozone-depleting chemicals by 68 percent. Earlier this month, the ozone hole was the smallest measured since 1988 (though still 2.5 times the size of the U.S.).

    “The rapid global decline in ozone-depleting substances shows that we can make positive change when we act decisively,” they wrote. “We have also made advancements in reducing extreme poverty and hungry.” Other global successes include: decline in fertility rates, decline in deforestation, and rapid growth in the renewable-energy sector, all of which are happening in certain regions.

    Within the doom-and-gloom disastrous future that scientists have predicted in their research, they offered several solutions. Though neither easy nor simple, they could reverse or at least curb humanity's current trajectory.

    One solution, likely the most obvious: Phase out fossil fuels and increase green technologies and renewable energy. Plus, divest from fossil fuels altogether. Divestment—which refers to the ending of monetary investments of fossil fuels—would “encourage positive environmental change.”

    [​IMG] Protestors with a giant silver baloon which symbolizes carbon emissions stand behind a banner with the message, "Divest. Keep it in the Ground" asking investment funds to move their money out of fossil fuels at the World Climate Change Conference 2015 (COP21) in Le Bourget, near Paris, France, December 2, 2015. Reuters

    Eating more plant-based foods would also curb the impending doom scientists predict, as well as reducing food waste overall. How to do that, they wrote, is through education and better infrastructure.

    The letter urges us all to prioritize reserves for the world’s land, marine, freshwater, and aerial habitats—particularly those that are well-funded and well-managed. Maintaining nature’s “ecosystem services” by ending the conversion of forests, grasslands, and other native habitats was another recommendation. Ecosystem services are services that humans can benefit from by letting nature function normally. Those two recommendations above relate to three other recommendations: restoring native plant communities, rewilding regions with native species, and implementing adequate policy to end the poaching crisis.

    [​IMG] Fire burns part of an estimated 105 tonnes of ivory and a tonne of rhino horn confiscated from smugglers and poachers at the Nairobi National Park near Nairobi, Kenya, April 30, 2016. Reuters

    Reproductive healthcare also made its way into the list of recommendations. Increasing education and voluntary family-planning services—especially where those resources are lacking—could reduce fertility rates. The human population has increased by 35 percent since 1992, the letter said, which adds further stress on Earth’s resources. They advise to estimate a scientifically defensible and sustainable population size for the long term.

    The economic structure should address wealth inequalities in order to ensure that prices, taxation, and incentive systems take into account the cost of consumption patterns on the environment. General appreciation of nature, and an increase in nature education for children could help, too.

    They ended with a positive message, writing: “We can make great progress for the sake of humanity and the planet on which we depend.”

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  2. nkfnkfnkf

    nkfnkfnkf Alfrescian Old Timer

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    http://www.thenational.scot/news/15...lish_stark_warning_on_the_future_of_humanity/


    15,000 scientists publish stark warning on the future of humanity
    Anna Reid
    upload_2017-11-14_3-34-46.gif

    15,000 scientists publish stark warning on the future of humanity




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    A PROPHETIC "Warning to Humanity" giving notice of perils facing the Earth has been issued by more than 15,000 scientists from around the world.

    The message, posted online, updates an original Warning from the Union of Concerned Scientists and around 1,700 signatories delivered in 1992.

    Today, the global scientific community's view of the future is even more bleak.

    Apart from the hole in the ozone layer, which has now been stabilised, every one of the major threats identified in 1992 has worsened.

    Runaway consumption of precious resources by an exploding population remains the biggest danger facing humankind, say the scientists.

    They urge "scientists, media influencers and lay citizens" to put pressure on governments to reverse the trend.

    A host of environmental calamities are highlighted in the warning notice, including catastrophic climate change, deforestation, mass species extinction, ocean "dead zones", and lack of access to fresh water.

    Writing in the online international journal BioScience, the scientists led by top US ecologist Professor William Ripple, from Oregon State University, said: "Humanity is now being given a second notice ... We are jeopardising our future by not reining in our intense but geographically and demographically uneven material consumption and by not perceiving continued rapid population growth as a primary driver behind many ecological and even societal threats.

    "By failing to adequately limit population growth, reassess the role of an economy rooted in growth, reduce greenhouse gases, incentivise renewable energy, protect habitat, restore ecosystems, curb pollution, halt defaunation, and constrain invasive alien species, humanity is not taking the urgent steps needed to safeguard our imperilled biosphere."

    In their original warning, scientists including most of the world's Nobel Laureates argued that human impacts on the natural world were likely to lead to "vast human misery".

    The new notice, written as an open-letter "viewpoint" article, won the support of 15,364 scientists from 184 countries who agreed to offer their names as signatories.

    The authors drew on data from government agencies, non-profit organisations and individual researchers to set out their case that environmental impacts were likely to inflict "substantial and irreversible harm" to the Earth.

    Prof Ripple said: "Those who signed this second warning aren't just raising a false alarm. They are acknowledging the obvious signs that we are heading down an unsustainable path.

    "We are hoping that our paper will ignite a widespread public debate about the global environment and climate."

    Progress had been made in some areas - such as cutting ozone-depleting chemicals, and increasing energy generated from renewable sources - but this was far outweighed by the damaging trends, said the scientists.


    They pointed out that in the past 25 years:

    • The amount of fresh water available per head of population worldwide has reduced by 26%.
    • The number of ocean "dead zones" - places where little can live because of pollution and oxygen starvation - has increased by 75%.
    • Nearly 300 million acres of forest have been lost, mostly to make way for agricultural land.
    • Global carbon emissions and average temperatures have shown continued significant increases.
    • Human population has risen by 35%.
    • Collectively the number of mammals, reptiles, amphibians, birds and fish in the world has fallen by 29%.
    Prof Ripple and his colleagues have formed a new independent organisation called the Alliance of World Scientists to voice concerns about environmental sustainability and the fate of humanity.
     
  3. nkfnkfnkf

    nkfnkfnkf Alfrescian Old Timer

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    http://www.express.co.uk/news/scien...apocalypse-overpopulation-extinction-humanity

    End of the world? THOUSANDS of Scientists issue bleak warning about future of mankind
    A STARK warning to humanity has been issued by experts and signed by an astonishing 15,000 scientists around the globe who all agree the end is nigh.
    By Sean Martin
    PUBLISHED: 17:01, Mon, Nov 13, 2017 | UPDATED: 17:10, Mon, Nov 13, 2017

    [​IMG]GETTY

    Scientists say we “are jeopardising our future”
    The message is an update on the 1992 caution sent out by the Union of Concerned Scientists which was backed by more than 1,700 experts who all said our future was bleak.

    But with little to no action being take, the prediction has escalated and more scientists are backing the warning.

    Issues such as a strain on natural resources has the experts urging "scientists, media influencers and lay citizens” to put more pressure on the powers that be to take more action.

    Major concerns on the list are a population which continues to grow rapidly, catastrophic climate change, deforestation, mass species extinction, ocean "dead zones", and lack of access to fresh water, which is leading scientists to warn that we “are jeopardising our future”.

    Related articles
    [​IMG]GETTY

    Overpopulation is a major concern
    The researchers say in the past 25 years the amount of fresh water available per person has reduced by 26 per cent and the places in oceans where nothing can live, known as “dead zones”, has increased by 75 per cent.

    An additional 300 million acres of forests have been lost and human population has jumped by 35 per cent while the number of animals has dropped by 29 per cent.

    Professor William Ripple, from Oregon State University, said: "Humanity is now being given a second notice.

    [​IMG]GETTY

    The number of animals has dropped by 29 per cent in the last 25 years
    Do these pictures 'prove' the end of the world is near?
    Thu, November 9, 2017
    According to conspiracy theorists, the end is upon us
    [​IMG] [​IMG] [​IMG] [​IMG]
    Play slideshow
    [​IMG]
    @preetalina/Twitter
    1 of 11
    This creature washed up on the shores of a Texas beach


    “We are jeopardising our future by not reining in our intense but geographically and demographically uneven material consumption and by not perceiving continued rapid population growth as a primary driver behind many ecological and even societal threats.

    "By failing to adequately limit population growth, reassess the role of an economy rooted in growth, reduce greenhouse gases, incentivise renewable energy, protect habitat, restore ecosystems, curb pollution, halt defaunation, and constrain invasive alien species, humanity is not taking the urgent steps needed to safeguard our imperilled biosphere."

    Prof Ripple said: "Those who signed this second warning aren't just raising a false alarm. They are acknowledging the obvious signs that we are heading down an unsustainable path.

    "We are hoping that our paper will ignite a widespread public debate about the global environment and climate."
     
  4. nkfnkfnkf

    nkfnkfnkf Alfrescian Old Timer

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    http://www.cbc.ca/news/technology/15000-scientists-warning-to-humanity-1.4395767


    More than 15,000 scientists from 184 countries issue 'warning to humanity'
    A similar warning was first issued by scientists in 1992
    By Nicole Mortillaro, CBC News Posted: Nov 13, 2017 10:00 AM ET Last Updated: Nov 13, 2017 10:53 AM ET

    [​IMG]
    Over 15,000 scientists signed an open letter published in BioScience warning humanity that we need to change our behaviours in order to protect the planet. (NOAA)

    [​IMG]

    Nicole Mortillaro
    Senior Writer, Science and Technology

    Nicole has an avid interest in all things science. As an amateur astronomer, Nicole can be found looking up at the night sky appreciating the marvels of our universe. She is the editor of the Journal of the Royal Astronomical Society of Canada and the author of several books.

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    More than 15,000 scientists around the world have issued a global warning: there needs to be change in order to save Earth.

    It comes 25 years after the first notice in 1992 when a mere 1,500 scientists issued a similar warning.

    This new cautioning — which gained popularity on Twitter with #ScientistsWarningToHumanity — garnered more than 15,000 signatures.

    William Ripple of Oregon State University's College of Forestry, who started the campaign, said that he came across the 1992 warning last February, and noticed that this year happened to mark the 25th anniversary.

    Together with his graduate student, Christopher Wolf, he decided to revisit the concerns raised then, and collect global data for different variables to show trends over the past 25 years.

    Ripple found:

    • A decline in freshwater availability.
    • Unsustainable marine fisheries.
    • Ocean dead zones.
    • Forest losses.
    • Dwindling biodiversity.
    • Climate change.
    • Population growth.
    There was one positive outcome, however: a rapid decline in ozone depletion.

    "The trends are alarming, and they speak for themselves," Ripple said, though he notes the improvement in the ozone hole illustrates that humanity can make change when needed.

    After writing the viewpoint article, which was accepted for publication in the journal BioScience, he decided to see if he could once again collect signatures.

    "I'd never tried that before, so in July I sent [the article] to 40 colleagues of mine, and by the next day, 600 scientists had signed it," he told CBC News.

    Almost 1900 scientists have signed the second #ScientistsWarningToHumanity Let's hit 5000 by the end of the week: https://t.co/20FLOjbzqw pic.twitter.com/fhAPcC6yfE

    @NewsomeTM
    Within two days, there were 1,200 signatures. Of the more than 15,364 signatures to date, 527 are from Canada, ranking eighth among 184 countries.

    The goal of the paper is to raise awareness about the fragile state of the planet.

    "The scientists around the world are very concerned about the state of the world, the environmental situation and climate change," Ripple said. "So this allows them to have a collective voice."

    Growing middle class and its carbon footprint
    "Since 1992, carbon emissions have increased 62 per cent," Ripple said. "And the global average temperature change has paralleled that. Also since 1992, we have two billion more people on Earth, which is a 35 per cent increase."

    However, he notes that there has been a rapid decline in fertility rates, but said that likely won't show up in the data until later.

    One of the chief concerns is population growth, but not in terms of numbers. Instead, the focus is on our ecological footprint with an increase in consumerism that puts a toll on the environment.

    [​IMG]
    Among the concerns scientists have about the environment is urban development and the threat it poses to biodiversity. (Steve Dodrill/Oregon State University)

    "What is happening is that the global middle class is growing, and it's growing extremely rapidly," said co-author Eileen Crist, a professor at Virginia Tech's Department of Science and Technology in Society.

    That comes from the very positive outcome of getting people out of poverty. But there's a catch.

    "But what sometimes people miss … they miss what's happening in the middle," Crist said. "Which from an ecological perspective of the planet is the most significant event: the rapid rise of the global middle class, which is now more than three billion people in the world and it's expected, by 2050 or so, to rise to five billion people."

    And it's the middle class where people begin to increase their carbon footprint: they buy appliances and cars, eat more meat and travel.

    'The chief concern isn't really the human numbers. It's the impact we have." - Eileen Crist, professor at Virginia Tech
    One of the potential solutions is to stabilize the population. If we reduce family size, consumption patterns don't rise as much. And that can be done by empowering girls and women, providing sexual education and education on family planning.

    "The chief concern isn't really the human numbers as such. It's the impact we have," Crist said.

    'In the throes of a mass extinction event'
    There is rising evidence that Earth has entered the sixth mass extinction event brought on by humans.

    "We are in the throes of a mass extinction event that is anthropogenic," Crist said. "This is not something we can fix. If we lose 50 to 75 per cent of the species on the planet in this century — which is what scientists are telling us what will occur if we continue to operate as business-as-usual — if this happens, this can not be fixed."

    When asked whether she's optimistic that the new petition will have an effect on changes, Crist said that she doesn't think of it that way. Taking care of the planet is akin to taking care of one's family.

    "We take care of our families: our children and our spouses and our parents. When you take care of your family, you don't do it because you're optimistic or pessimistic … it's because that's what you do.

    "Our mandate is that we take care of Earth and earthlings and human beings because we're all family."

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  5. nkfnkfnkf

    nkfnkfnkf Alfrescian Old Timer

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    https://motherboard.vice.com/en_us/...nity-second-notice-climate-change-environment


    15,000 Scientists From 184 Countries Are Warning Humankind We Are Screwed
    Human impacts on the environment are putting our future at risk, they say.
    • [​IMG]
      Stephen Leahy


      Nov 13 2017, 3:00pm[​IMG]
      A large crowd of people at a concert in Paris. Image: James Cridland/Flickr

      More than 15,000 scientists from 184 countries warn the evidence is clear: Current and future human health and wellbeing are at serious risk from climate change, deforestation, loss of access to freshwater, species extinctions, and human population growth.

      Eminent scientists Jane Goodall, E.O. Wilson, and James Hansen are among those who have cosigned the warning, published Monday in the journal BioScience. The article, titled “World Scientists' Warning to Humanity: A Second Notice,” has 15,372 signatories in total, from a range of scientific disciplines. It is thought to be the largest-ever formal support by scientists for a journal article.

      The “Second Notice” article updates the original “World Scientists' Warning to Humanity” document released in 1992, 25 years ago this month. Signed by 1700 scientists, including most of the living Nobel Prize science winners, it warned that human impacts on the environment were putting “at serious risk the future that we wish for human society” and detailed several worrisome trends.

      [​IMG]
      Jane Goodall. Image: Urban Explorer Hamburg/Flickr
      “We did the update because we wanted to let the public know where we stand today,” said William Ripple, an ecologist at Oregon State University and co-author the “Second Notice” article. With few exceptions, those trends have gotten far worse over the past 25 years.

      “Since 1992, CO2 [carbon dioxide] emissions have jumped 62 percent and the global temperature is up 29 percent, while the abundance of vertebrate wildlife has plunged 29 percent,” Ripple told Motherboard.

      The data compiled by the researchers revealed that in the past 25 years, there has been:
      • A 26 percent reduction in the amount of freshwater available per capita
      • A 75 percent increase in the number of ocean dead zones
      • A loss of nearly 300 million acres of forestland
      “These are alarming trends. We need the services provided by nature for our own survival,” he said.

      The plant, animal, insect, fish, and other species in nature perform a variety of tasks, like producing oxygen, cleaning water, and pollination. Altogether the goods and services nature provides is estimated to be worth between $125-145 trillion USD per year. And with addition of two billion people since 1992—a 35 percent increase in global population—those vital services are under increasing stress, the article said.

      One positive trend is the healing of the ozone layer, which protects all living things from harmful ultraviolet radiation. In 1987, countries came together under the UN’s Montreal Protocol to ban ozone-damaging chemicals. The growing use of renewable energy is another positive trend, said Ripple.

      Read More: Jane Goodall Is on a 'Mission to Save the World'

      There was little focus on climate change in the original warning, but it did urge humanity to move away from using fossil fuels. At the UN climate conference in Bonn, Germany on Monday, another group of scientists warned that global CO2 emissions are likely to rise after being stable for the past three years.

      “Climate change is here. It is dangerous. And it is about to get much worse,” said Johan Rockström, executive director of the Stockholm Resilience Centre, an international centre for sustainability science, in a statement.

      US CO2 emissions are expected to rise 2.2 percent in 2018 mostly because of a cold winter forecast. Emissions from China and India are also still growing, albeit at a slower pace than a few years ago.

      [​IMG]
      Image: NASA/Wikimedia Commons
      “The news that emissions are rising after the three-year hiatus is a giant leap backwards for humankind,” said Amy Luers, executive director of Future Earth, an international sustainability science research organization.

      “Emissions need to peak soon and approach zero by 2050,” Luers said in a release.

      Ripple agrees that there is an urgent need to reduce CO2 emissions, and said their “Second Notice” article lists a number of ways to halt the environmental trend declines, including creating more parks and nature reserves, curbing wildlife trade, shifting to plant-based diets, expanding family planning and educational programs for women, and massively adopting renewable energy and other "green" technologies.

      “Working together... we can make great progress for the sake of humanity and the planet on which we depend,” the article concludes optimistically.

      “We are hoping that our paper will ignite a widespread public debate about the global environment and climate,” said Ripple.

      However, the media ignored the original 1992 Scientists’ Warning to Humanity, with The New York Times and Washington Post saying it wasn’t newsworthy.

      Get six of our favorite Motherboard stories every day by signing up for our newsletter .
     
  6. nkfnkfnkf

    nkfnkfnkf Alfrescian Old Timer

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    https://www.bostonglobe.com/metro/2...destruction/isvMV5MMREYzflCYetbR0N/story.html

    Scientists warn Earth is on the road to ruin
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    By Martin Finucane Globe Staff November 13, 2017
    [​IMG]
    NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

    This is our only home and we shouldn’t ruin it, thousands of scientists say.

    More than 15,000 scientists from 184 countries worldwide, including scores from Massachusetts universities, have signed a letter warning that Earth’s environment is on the road to destruction.

    The “World Scientists’ Warning to Humanity: Second Notice,” calls for action to avert irreversible damage to the planet. The letter was published as a Viewpoint article in Monday’s edition of the journal Bioscience.

    The number of signatories may be the largest for any published scientific paper ever, said co-author Thomas Newsome, a research fellow at Deakin University and The University of Sydney.

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    “It’s an overwhelming response we didn’t quite expect,” he said in a statement. “People just started sharing the letter; it was added to a few e-mail lists and things just took off from there.”

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    The paper is a “second notice” because 25 years ago, a majority of the world’s Nobel laureates and other scientists signed a warning letter, saying issues such as ozone depletion, forest loss, climate change, and population growth needed to be addressed.

    RELATED: Climate change will hit New England hard, report says


    [​IMG]
    View Story
    Region losing 65 acres of forests a day, report finds
    Massachusetts alone is losing 7,000 acres of forestland a year to development, the report said.

    “In this paper we look back on these trends and evaluate the subsequent human response by exploring the available data,” Newsome said. Of nine areas, only one has seen improvement: There’s been a reduction in chemicals that harm the ozone layer, the university said.

    The scientists said that especially troubling was the “current trajectory of potentially catastrophic climate change.”

    RELATED: Boston wants to fight climate change. So why is every new building made of glass?

    The letter is being released as the UN Climate Change Conference is underway in Bonn, Germany, amid what organizers say is a renewed urgency due to extreme weather events like this year’s hurricanes and wildfires.

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    “To prevent widespread misery and catastrophic biodiversity loss, humanity must practice a more environmentally sustainable alternative to business as usual. This prescription was well articulated by the world’s leading scientists 25 years ago, but in most respects, we have not heeded their warning,” the article said.

    “Soon it will be too late to shift course away from our failing trajectory, and time is running out. We must recognize, in our day-to-day lives and in our governing institutions, that Earth with all its life is our only home,” the article said.



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  7. nkfnkfnkf

    nkfnkfnkf Alfrescian Old Timer

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    There is ALWAYS a mistake when they used the word Humanity, because then they will NOT ADMIT the truth that IT IS JUST ABOUT OVER-POPULATION!

    The Wrong Spirit of Humanity led us here to this DEAD END, and they still want to Deny it is due to this current figure of 8 billion!

    Exactly, they are trying to still AVOID TO RID the over-population and Persist the same mistake!

    That is why we will still be Wasting Time & Resources going the Wrong Way Round & be Extincted!

    The whole crisis is just because Man are overly squandering resources to pamper ourselves and converted way way too much of resources into WASTE and pollution (including HEAT from our energy consumption) as an Overall and involving th whole of 8 billion people.

    The dream of ruining and abandoning earth and fleeing to seek survival elsewhere is greedy naive selfish and childish - of course STUPID!

    The only chance we have is to dramatically reduce 8 billion to something like 8 million ASAP, and cut down the urbanization and pampering comfort for Majority. Keep population and consumption extremely low for few hundred years to let earth have a chance to recover.

    The crap idea Recycle is Far Too Lame and INADEQUATE, the big wrong idea behind Recycle is to keep pampering a huge population and sustain them further - buy more time. It will stretch the ending period a bit longer, but it will NEVER solve it, and at the end of it's stretching the final chance is completely lost. Time is not what we have, and we need a solution that isn't just buying time in any way.
     
  8. nayr69sg

    nayr69sg Alfrescian Old Timer

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    Total rubbish. So what are all these 15,000 scientists doing everyday? No car? No bus? No train? Ride bicycle?

    No refrigerator? No lights? Only Candle? Burn wood for heat? No air conditioning? They grow their own food?

    Rubbish lah.
     
  9. Leongsam

    Leongsam Administrator Staff Member Old Timer Old Timer

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    They want everyone else to give up the luxuries of modern living so they can continue with their merry ways.
     
  10. glockman

    glockman Alfrescian (Inf)

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    Do not ever believe these naysayers. They live their lives in fear, so they are constantly thinking, making decisions based on this fear. It's all a fallacy.
     
  11. eatshitndie

    eatshitndie Alfrescian (Inf)

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    the world would be wasted anyway if africans, middle eastern religious fanatics, lower caste nehs, banglas, rohingyas, pinoys, indons and loser muds were to outproduce taller and fairer skinned higher mortals. it’s like the underlying warning in lord of the rings: orcs running roughshod over elves and men.
     
  12. congo9

    congo9 Alfrescian Old Timer

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    Don't be silly.
    The World will end sooner or later. Do not fret.

    Even without all the Human, Petrol burning. It will end.
     
  13. ToaPehGong

    ToaPehGong Alfrescian Old Timer

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    Read this post so long. I'll die first before finish reading it
     
  14. nkfnkfnkf

    nkfnkfnkf Alfrescian Old Timer

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    The significance is this that SCIENCE can NEVER SAVE HUMANITY. Scientists are Signing Off and Giving Up! They called for Action - by others not themselves any more! They call for Warriors, Warlords, Dictators, (think Kim Jong Nuke) Dotard, ISIS, etc to ACT. Scientists can not be blamed nor further expected of, they invented solutions such as NUKE 70 years ago, and politicians only used in Hiroshima and Nagasaki, and later banned them, try to prevent Saddam from having them, try to prevent Kim Jong Nuke from using them.. etc. Man only exploited inventions of scientists to pamper themselves and ruined earth. This is call SUICIDE.

    More inventions from scientists are only going to Ruin Earth even faster and into Extinction Faster. There is no doubt about this, 15,000 scientists knows, so they signed off and tell us at least half the truth. The other half that got stuck in their mouth is:

    Humanity is the Virus that killed almost whole planet earth. It is Stupidity and Foolishness to the ULTIMATE.

    The other part of truth is that ever growing population level is infinity in nature (now @8 billion, will be 80billion, 8trillion... infinity) scientists failed to find 2nd planet earth, and they actually need hundreds or thousands or countless number of planet earths = impossibility!



    Humanity is to be punished and destroyed.

    Scientist dare not tell these truths, so shut their mouths.

    They called for actions. But actions by whom?

    Religious leaders? Political Leaders? Humanity Mongers?

    These idiots who preached Humanity just about a century ago, must kneel down and slap they own faces and perform Seppuku Suicide ASAP! Repent is useless they will not be forgiven for misguiding the whole world and causing TOTAL EXTINCTION! Before these foolish bastards, man lived 2.6 million years on this planet CORRECTLY and in sustainable healthy balance with planet earth's resources! These bastards preached Humanity and Pamper People and Prevented Necessary Carnage & Eliminations, causing Total Extinction Suicide to begin! This is their crime, we have to punish and destroy them weather they deny or not, we don't give a shit!
     
  15. pakchewcheng

    pakchewcheng Alfrescian Old Timer

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    Aiyah!

    This problem easily resolved when fingers started pressing red buttons and nukes going kaboom all over.

    So no need to fuck care at all
     
  16. nkfnkfnkf

    nkfnkfnkf Alfrescian Old Timer

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    Unfortunately there is only one finger globally that is devoted to pressing the button, all the rest got NO BALLS, and foolishly dreaming of a nice prosper future with unlimited resources from planet earth to enjoy and exploit. Fortunately we still have one Kim Jong Nuke, but Unfortunately again, he still has insufficient number of H-bombs and Hwasong ICBMs to get this Big Job done. I hope he work harder.

    Now after the scientists' community of the globe had signed off a warning, and basically we all know now that we can not look upon science itself to save our ass, I hope the Rich & Powerful will dedicate their resources to fully help Kim Jong Nuke expedite his Big Programs. He need 30K to 40K H-bombs to cover 6K+ Cities (million population level) and 30K+ towns with sub-million level populations. He need 30K Huge Hwasoongs & most of them with MIRV multi-warhead capabilities, or else need 40K+ to 50K Missiles big and small, depending on range.
     
  17. nkfnkfnkf

    nkfnkfnkf Alfrescian Old Timer

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    Every minute every seconds past the planet earth is being Plundered and Squandered of tons of precious resources, and converted to Waste & Pollutions, including HEAT POLLUTION. We are talking about planet earth being a FINITE & LIMITED amount of resources. Total Mass of Planet is 5.972 × 10^24 kg. If Recycle Idea could be a solution then we won't have 15,000 scientist signing a warning at all. Forget about scientists, we can not expect them to offer solution, the top one of them Hopkins said repeatedly that he want to be the 1st to leave earth to find a new habitat. I read him as saying I want to be the 1st to flee and pse prepare resources for my departure.

    Forget about educating 8 billion people, it is beyond knowledge can help, unless this 8 billion can live without resources, it is either ALL of them have to die or MOST OF THEM DEAD with a tiny minority of survivors.

    The tiny chance of the tiny amount of survivors depends on how soon the rest of the 8 billions can die. If it happen right now, there should be still enough resources of say 8 million to live for a century or 800K to live for 10 centuries. But if we delayed a few more years, there may be no resources for even 8K of survivors to sustain a year, because by then 9 billion would had squandered away most of the remaining resources, and made the planet so ruined that man can only live in heavily protected enclosures, and going outdoor without a space suit be sure death in the toxic and hot hell on earth.
     
  18. nkfnkfnkf

    nkfnkfnkf Alfrescian Old Timer

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    WAF? I didn't know this was the 2nd warning.

    https://www.washingtonpost.com/news...nd-notice-to-humanity/?utm_term=.2e0d32c6b9b1

    Thousands of scientists issue bleak ‘second notice’ to humanity


    By Sarah Kaplan November 13 at 3:14 PM
    warning to humanity.” They said humans had pushed Earth's ecosystems to their breaking point and were well on the way to ruining the planet. The letter listed environmental impacts like they were biblical plagues — stratospheric ozone depletion, air and water pollution, the collapse of fisheries and loss of soil productivity, deforestation, species loss and catastrophic global climate change caused by the burning of fossil fuels.

    “If not checked,” wrote the scientists, led by particle physicist and Union of Concerned Scientists co-founder Henry Kendall, “many of our current practices put at serious risk the future that we wish for human society and the plant and animal kingdoms, and may so alter the living world that it will be unable to sustain life in the manner that we know.”

    But things were only going to get worse.

    To mark the letter's 25th anniversary, researchers have issued a bracing follow-up. In a communique published Monday in the journal BioScience, more than 15,000 scientists from 184 countries assess the world's latest responses to various environmental threats. Once again, they find us sorely wanting.

    “Humanity has failed to make sufficient progress in generally solving these foreseen environmental challenges, and alarmingly, most of them are getting far worse,” they write.

    This letter, spearheaded by Oregon State University ecologist William Ripple, serves as a “second notice,” the authors say: “Soon it will be too late to shift course away from our failing trajectory.”

    Global climate change sits atop the new letter's list of planetary threats. Global average temperatures have risen by more than half a degree Celsius since 1992, and annual carbon dioxide emissions have increased by 62 percent.


    But it's far from the only problem people face. Access to fresh water has declined, as has the amount of forestland and the number of wild-caught fish (a marker of the health of global fisheries). The number of ocean dead zones has increased. The human population grew by a whopping 2 billion, while the populations of all other mammals, reptiles, amphibians and fish have declined by nearly 30 percent.

    The lone bright spot exists way up in the stratosphere, where the hole in the planet's protective ozone layer has shrunk to its smallest size since 1988. Scientists credit that progress to the phasing out of chlorofluorocarbons — chemicals once used in refrigerators, air conditioners and aerosol cans that trigger reactions in the atmosphere to break down ozone.

    “The rapid global decline in ozone depleting substances shows that we can make positive change when we act decisively,” the letter says.

    The authors offer 13 suggestions for reining in our impact on the planet, including establishing nature reserves, reducing food waste, developing green technologies and establishing economic incentives to shift patterns of consumption.

    To this end, Ripple and his colleagues have formed a new organization, the Alliance of World Scientists, aimed at providing a science-based perspective on issues affecting the well-being of people and the planet.

    “Scientists are in the business of analyzing data and looking at the long-term consequences,” Ripple said in a release. “Those who signed this second warning aren't just raising a false alarm. They are acknowledging the obvious signs that we are heading down an unsustainable path. We are hoping that our paper will ignite a widespread public debate about the global environment and climate.”

    Read more:

    The Earth's ozone hole is shrinking and is the smallest it has been since 1988

    Fossil fuel emissions will reach an all-time high in 2017, scientists say — dashing hopes of progress

    Trump's top environmental pick says she has 'many questions' about climate change




    https://academic.oup.com/bioscience/article/doi/10.1093/biosci/bix125/4605229

    World Scientists’ Warning to Humanity: A Second Notice
    William J. Ripple Christopher Wolf Thomas M. Newsome Mauro Galetti Mohammed Alamgir Eileen Crist Mahmoud I. Mahmoud William F. Laurance 15,364 scientist signatories from 184 countries
    BioScience, bix125, https://doi.org/10.1093/biosci/bix125
    Published:
    13 November 2017

    Twenty-five years ago, the Union of Concerned Scientists and more than 1700 independent scientists, including the majority of living Nobel laureates in the sciences, penned the 1992 “World Scientists’ Warning to Humanity” (see supplemental file S1). These concerned professionals called on humankind to curtail environmental destruction and cautioned that “a great change in our stewardship of the Earth and the life on it is required, if vast human misery is to be avoided.” In their manifesto, they showed that humans were on a collision course with the natural world. They expressed concern about current, impending, or potential damage on planet Earth involving ozone depletion, freshwater availability, marine life depletion, ocean dead zones, forest loss, biodiversity destruction, climate change, and continued human population growth. They proclaimed that fundamental changes were urgently needed to avoid the consequences our present course would bring.

    The authors of the 1992 declaration feared that humanity was pushing Earth's ecosystems beyond their capacities to support the web of life. They described how we are fast approaching many of the limits of what the biosphere can tolerate without substantial and irreversible harm. The scientists pleaded that we stabilize the human population, describing how our large numbers—swelled by another 2 billion people since 1992, a 35 percent increase—exert stresses on Earth that can overwhelm other efforts to realize a sustainable future (Crist et al. 2017). They implored that we cut greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions and phase out fossil fuels, reduce deforestation, and reverse the trend of collapsing biodiversity.

    On the twenty-fifth anniversary of their call, we look back at their warning and evaluate the human response by exploring available time-series data. Since 1992, with the exception of stabilizing the stratospheric ozone layer, humanity has failed to make sufficient progress in generally solving these foreseen environmental challenges, and alarmingly, most of them are getting far worse (figure file S1). Especially troubling is the current trajectory of potentially catastrophic climate change due to rising GHGs from burning fossil fuels (Hansen et al. 2013), deforestation (Keenan et al. 2015), and agricultural production—particularly from farming ruminants for meat consumption (Ripple et al. 2014). Moreover, we have unleashed a mass extinction event, the sixth in roughly 540 million years, wherein many current life forms could be annihilated or at least committed to extinction by the end of this century.

    Figure 1.
    [​IMG]
    View large Download slide
    Trends over time for environmental issues identified in the 1992 scientists’ warning to humanity. The years before and after the 1992 scientists’ warning are shown as gray and black lines, respectively. Panel (a) shows emissions of halogen source gases, which deplete stratospheric ozone, assuming a constant natural emission rate of 0.11 Mt CFC-11-equivalent per year. In panel (c), marine catch has been going down since the mid-1990s, but at the same time, fishing effort has been going up (supplemental file S1). The vertebrate abundance index in panel (f) has been adjusted for taxonomic and geographic bias but incorporates relatively little data from developing countries, where there are the fewest studies; between 1970 and 2012, vertebrates declined by 58 percent, with freshwater, marine, and terrestrial populations declining by 81, 36, and 35 percent, respectively (file S1). Five-year means are shown in panel (h). In panel (i), ruminant livestock consist of domestic cattle, sheep, goats, and buffaloes. Note that y-axes do not start at zero, and it is important to inspect the data range when interpreting each graph. Percentage change, since 1992, for the variables in each panel are as follows: (a) –68.1%; (b) –26.1%; (c) –6.4%; (d) +75.3%; (e) –2.8%; (f) –28.9%; (g) +62.1%; (h) +167.6%; and (i) humans: +35.5%, ruminant livestock: +20.5%. Additional descriptions of the variables and trends, as well as sources for figure file S1.

    Humanity is now being given a second notice, as illustrated by these alarming trends (figure 1). We are jeopardizing our future by not reining in our intense but geographically and demographically uneven material consumption and by not perceiving continued rapid population growth as a primary driver behind many ecological and even societal threats (Crist et al. 2017). By failing to adequately limit population growth, reassess the role of an economy rooted in growth, reduce greenhouse gases, incentivize renewable energy, protect habitat, restore ecosystems, curb pollution, halt defaunation, and constrain invasive alien species, humanity is not taking the urgent steps needed to safeguard our imperilled biosphere.

    As most political leaders respond to pressure, scientists, media influencers, and lay citizens must insist that their governments take immediate action as a moral imperative to current and future generations of human and other life. With a groundswell of organized grassroots efforts, dogged opposition can be overcome and political leaders compelled to do the right thing. It is also time to re-examine and change our individual behaviors, including limiting our own reproduction (ideally to replacement level at most) and drastically diminishing our per capita consumption of fossil fuels, meat, and other resources.

    The rapid global decline in ozone-depleting substances shows that we can make positive change when we act decisively. We have also made advancements in reducing extreme poverty and hunger (www.worldbank.org). Other notable progress (which does not yet show up in the global data sets in figure www.un.org/esa/population), the promising decline in the rate of deforestation in some regions, and the rapid growth in the renewable-energy sector. We have learned much since 1992, but the advancement of urgently needed changes in environmental policy, human behavior, and global inequities is still far from sufficient.

    Sustainability transitions come about in diverse ways, and all require civil-society pressure and evidence-based advocacy, political leadership, and a solid understanding of policy instruments, markets, and other drivers. Examples of diverse and effective steps humanity can take to transition to sustainability include the following (not in order of importance or urgency): (a) prioritizing the enactment of connected well-funded and well-managed reserves for a significant proportion of the world's terrestrial, marine, freshwater, and aerial habitats; (b) maintaining nature's ecosystem services by halting the conversion of forests, grasslands, and other native habitats; (c) restoring native plant communities at large scales, particularly forest landscapes; (d) rewilding regions with native species, especially apex predators, to restore ecological processes and dynamics; (e) developing and adopting adequate policy instruments to remedy defaunation, the poaching crisis, and the exploitation and trade of threatened species; (f) reducing food waste through education and better infrastructure; (g) promoting dietary shifts towards mostly plant-based foods; (h) further reducing fertility rates by ensuring that women and men have access to education and voluntary family-planning services, especially where such resources are still lacking; (i) increasing outdoor nature education for children, as well as the overall engagement of society in the appreciation of nature; (j) divesting of monetary investments and purchases to encourage positive environmental change; (k) devising and promoting new green technologies and massively adopting renewable energy sources while phasing out subsidies to energy production through fossil fuels; (l) revising our economy to reduce wealth inequality and ensure that prices, taxation, and incentive systems take into account the real costs which consumption patterns impose on our environment; and (m) estimating a scientifically defensible, sustainable human population size for the long term while rallying nations and leaders to support that vital goal.

    To prevent widespread misery and catastrophic biodiversity loss, humanity must practice a more environmentally sustainable alternative to business as usual. This prescription was well articulated by the world's leading scientists 25 years ago, but in most respects, we have not heeded their warning. Soon it will be too late to shift course away from our failing trajectory, and time is running out. We must recognize, in our day-to-day lives and in our governing institutions, that Earth with all its life is our only home.

    Epilogue
    We have been overwhelmed with the support for our article and thank the more than 15,000 signatories from all ends of the Earth (see supplemental file S2 for list of signatories). As far as we know, this is the most scientists to ever co-sign and formally support a published journal article. In this paper, we have captured the environmental trends over the last 25 years, showed realistic concern, and suggested a few examples of possible remedies. Now, as an Alliance of World Scientists (scientists.forestry.oregonstate.edu) and with the public at large, it is important to continue this work to document challenges, as well as improved situations, and to develop clear, trackable, and practical solutions while communicating trends and needs to world leaders. Working together while respecting the diversity of people and opinions and the need for social justice around the world, we can make great progress for the sake of humanity and the planet on which we depend.

    Spanish, Portuguese, and French versions of this article can be found in file S1.

    Acknowledgments
    Peter Frumhoff and Doug Boucher of the Union of Concerned Scientists, as well as the following individuals, provided thoughtful discussions, comments, or data for this paper: Stuart Pimm, David Johns, David Pengelley, Guillaume Chapron, Steve Montzka, Robert Diaz, Drik Zeller, Gary Gibson, Leslie Green, Nick Houtman, Peter Stoel, Karen Josephson, Robin Comforto, Terralyn Vandetta, Luke Painter, Rodolfo Dirzo, Guy Peer, Peter Haswell, and Robert Johnson.

    Supplemental material
    Supplementary data are available at BIOSCI online including supplemental file 1 and supplemental file 2 (full list of all 15,364 signatories).

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    © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the American Institute of Biological Sciences. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: [email protected]
    Issue Section:
    Viewpoint
    Supplementary data
    Supplemental data
    Supplementary data are available at
    BIOSCI online including supplemental file 1 and supplemental file 2 (full list of all 15,364 signatories).

    - zip file





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  19. nkfnkfnkf

    nkfnkfnkf Alfrescian Old Timer

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    [​IMG]

    Trends over time for environmental issues identified in the 1992 scientists’ warning to humanity. The years before and after the 1992 scientists’ warning are shown as gray and black lines, respectively. Panel (a) shows emissions of halogen source gases, which deplete stratospheric ozone, assuming a constant natural emission rate of 0.11 Mt CFC-11-equivalent per year. In panel (c), marine catch has been going down since the mid-1990s, but at the same time, fishing effort has been going up (supplemental file S1). The vertebrate abundance index in panel (f) has been adjusted for taxonomic and geographic bias but incorporates relatively little data from developing countries, where there are the fewest studies; between 1970 and 2012, vertebrates declined by 58 percent, with freshwater, marine, and terrestrial populations declining by 81, 36, and 35 percent, respectively (file S1). Five-year means are shown in panel (h). In panel (i), ruminant livestock consist of domestic cattle, sheep, goats, and buffaloes. Note that y-axes do not start at zero, and it is important to inspect the data range when interpreting each graph. Percentage change, since 1992, for the variables in each panel are as follows: (a) –68.1%; (b) –26.1%; (c) –6.4%; (d) +75.3%; (e) –2.8%; (f) –28.9%; (g) +62.1%; (h) +167.6%; and (i) humans: +35.5%, ruminant livestock: +20.5%. Additional descriptions of the variables and trends, as well as sources for figure file S1.
     
  20. nkfnkfnkf

    nkfnkfnkf Alfrescian Old Timer

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    http://www.statesman.com/news/natio...n-too-late-save-earth/woVWBJxkJDKpUWjD5unl0J/

    15,000 scientists warn it will soon be 'too late' to save Earth

    • Jason Lemon, The Atlanta Journal-Constitution
    9:17 a.m. Tuesday, Nov. 14, 2017 Nation & World


    0

    Nation & World



    More than 15,000 scientists have signed a dire warning letter to humanity, urging society to address major environmental concerns.

    » RELATED: What’s in the federal climate report? 7 key takeaways

    "Soon it will be too late to shift course away from our failing trajectory, and time is running out," scientists wrote in the letter signed by 15,364 of their colleagues from 184 countries. "We must recognize, in our day-to-day lives and in our governing institutions, that Earth with all its life is our only home."

    Titled as a "Second Notice," the stern warning comes 25 years after similar concerns were expressed in a letter backed by more than 1,700 scientists. However, as the updated warning points out, things have significantly worsened since then.

    » RELATED: The best US cities to avoid effects of climate change, according to report

    "Humanity has failed to make sufficient progress in generally solving these foreseen environmental challenges, and alarmingly, most of them are getting far worse," the letter says.

    >> Read more trending news

    Freshwater resources and vertebrate species have dropped by approximately 25 percent since 1960. At the same time, marine dead zones have increased dramatically by 75 percent and carbon dioxide emissions have risen by 62 percent. The human population has also skyrocketed from 3 billion to roughly 7.6 billion.

    » RELATED: What is the Paris climate agreement? 9 things you should know

    Furthermore, human activity has "unleashed a mass extinction event, the sixth in roughly 540 million years, wherein many current life forms could be annihilated or at least committed to extinction by the end of this century," the scientists warn.

    The only hopeful part of the letter points to the stabilization of the stratospheric ozone layer. According to Newsweek, scientists revealed this month that the hole in the ozone layer, which hovers above Antarctica, is the smallest it has been since 1988.

    » RELATED: GAO: Climate change already costing US billions in losses

    But this one positive development isn't enough to curb the impending crisis, according to the scientists.

    "Humanity is now being given a second notice ... We are jeopardizing our future by not reining in our intense but geographically and demographically uneven material consumption and by not perceiving continued rapid population growth as a primary driver behind many ecological and even societal threats," they wrote.

    » RELATED: Doctors: Global warming is taking a toll on people's health

    The scientists said humanity must quickly "limit population growth, reassess the role of an economy rooted in growth, reduce greenhouse gases, incentivize renewable energy, protect habitat, restore ecosystems, curb pollution, halt defaunation, and constrain invasive alien species ... Humanity is not taking the urgent steps needed to safeguard our imperiled biosphere.”

    Drastic solutions are required to solve the coming global crisis, according to the scientists. These include phasing out fossil fuels while encouraging renewable energy sources, transitioning to a more plant-based diet, reducing food waste overall and prioritizing reserves for Earth's land, marine, freshwater and aerial habitats.

    » RELATED: Atlanta makes ambitious commitment to 100 percent clean energy by 2035

    "To prevent widespread misery and catastrophic biodiversity loss, humanity must practice a more environmentally sustainable alternative to business as usual," the scientists wrote.

    While nations around the world have officially recognized the need to address these concerns and the threat to humanity's existence, the current U.S. administration appears uninterested in heeding such warnings.

    President Donald Trump said in June that he would pull the U.S. out of the landmark 2015 Paris climate agreement, joining only two other nations -- Syria and Nicaragua -- which had not signed the international accord.

    Since then, Nicaragua agreed to sign the agreement in October, and Syria followed earlier this month.

    » RELATED: US cities, states defy Trump, still back Paris climate deal

    Instead of addressing greenhouse gas emissions as the Paris accord requires, the White House said it "will promote coal, natural gas and nuclear energy as an answer to climate change,” a decision scientists around the globe have warned against.

    [​IMG]
    IN SPACE - In this handout photo provided by the European Space Agency (ESA) on July 17, 2014, German ESA astronaut Alexander Gerst took this image of the Earth reflecting light from the sun whilst aboard the International Space Station (ISS). (Photo by Alexander Gerst / ESA via Getty Images) ESA
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