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Chronic lifestyle disease sufferers will have few future full-time job options

Discussion in 'The Political / Serious Zone [no rep deductions]' started by bic_cherry, Oct 26, 2017.

  1. bic_cherry

    bic_cherry Alfrescian Old Timer

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    Chronic lifestyle disease sufferers will have few future full-time job options.
    "an ageing workforce and medical cost inflation in Singapore are projected to drive up average medical costs per employee by 108 per cent to S$1,973 per year in 2030, representing a mounting financial burden for employers.... ....What is worth noting is that 60 per cent of all medical claim costs will be attributable to 10 per cent of claimants, said Mercer..."

    Means that HR will also require submission of smoking status, waist-height ratio/BMI, impedance tested muscle to fat ratio https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4842420/ , IPPT / 2.4km run timing score, pre-IPPT SAF FFI results by interested candidates to qualify for job interview since a sickly employee can easily cause company purchased employee healthcare insurance premiums to rise stratospherically (~$12k p.a. /pax upwards) if insurance actuaries determine the employee population to be high healthcare service consumption risk at application / annual renewal of healthcare insurance policy.

    Productivity loss (average $2-4000/pax p.a.) due to drowsiness @work or sick leave would also be high for employees with diabetes, hypertension, obstructive sleep apnea, high cholesterol, smokers etc.

    Personal health will be one key employee selection criteria towards the provision of future full-time job /employment.

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    Singapore productivity loss due to sick leave may hit $3.3b by 2030: Mercer study
    [​IMG]
    The study reveals that an ageing workforce and medical cost inflation in Singapore are projected to drive up average medical costs per employee by 108 per cent.
    The study reveals that an ageing workforce and medical cost inflation in Singapore are projected to drive up average medical costs per employee by 108 per cent.PHOTO: ST FILE
    PUBLISHED. OCT 25, 2017, 10:46 AM SGT
    Ann Williams
    SINGAPORE - Singapore productivity loss due to sickness absenteeism may reach S$3.3 billion by 2030, says Mercer in a study released on Wednesday (Oct 25).

    The study reveals that an ageing workforce and medical cost inflation in Singapore are projected to drive up average medical costs per employee by 108 per cent to S$1,973 per year in 2030, representing a mounting financial burden for employers.

    Mercer, together with Marsh & McLennan Companies' Asia Pacific Risk Centre (APRC), issued the report on Aging Workforce: Cost And Productivity Challenges Of Ill Health In Singapore.


    The segment of Singapore employees aged over 50 is projected to increase by 55 per cent, and to represent 40 per cent of the workforce by 2030. With an increase in demand for medical services, the ageing demographic will contribute to 41 per cent of the escalation in medical costs, as it will drive a rise in the utilisation of healthcare services, which together with healthcare cost inflation, will result in a significant surge in overall costs.

    "With improved management of health conditions permitting individuals to stay in the workforce longer, increasing financial needs in retirement, as well as more flexible employment options, such as working from home, and on-demand jobs in the gig economy, there is a growing trend for Singapore employees to postpone their retirement," said Neil Narale, Singapore business leader for Mercer Marsh Benefits.

    "However, health risks increase with age, ranging from diminishing motor and sensory functions to a greater incidence of chronic diseases, which will create challenges for employers."

    In Singapore, societal ageing is estimated to drive the prevalence of chronic diseases such as cancer and diabetes by up to 200 per cent by 2030, which means Singapore will face the challenges of stagnating productivity growth through increasing rates of absenteeism and presenteeism, said the report.

    Based on current trends, productivity loss due to sickness absenteeism per employee is projected to increase by 25 per cent based on GNI (gross national income). With an ageing workforce, at the national level this represents a cost of S$3.3 billion by 2030, a 43 per cent increase from 2016.

    [​IMG]

    What is worth noting is that 60 per cent of all medical claim costs will be attributable to 10 per cent of claimants, said Mercer.

    This highlights the value of interventions for high-risk groups, such as health and wellness programmes to reduce the incidence of disease, and screening for earlier detection of disease, it added.

    But while an ageing workforce may present challenges related to higher healthcare needs, older workers are associated with advantages such as greater firm-specific knowledge and lower turnover rates, Mercer noted.

    "If managed properly, diversity of age at work can serve to improve productivity and reduce the need for governments to tax corporates and the next generation to support the elderly," said Mr Narale.

    http://www.straitstimes.com/busines...-sick-leave-may-hit-s33b-by-2030-mercer-study
     

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